Academics / Degree Programs / Master’...

Master’s Program in Computer Science

Thesis Options

Without Thesis:

Students must have demonstrated proficiency in the core undergraduate curriculum including the topics normally covered by CSE 324, 325, 331, 342, 344, and 423. Proof of proficiency usually requires grades of “C” or better in these courses or in equivalent courses approved by the department. Course work approved by the students advisory committee fulfilling the general requirements of 27 credit hours for the masters degree. At least 15 credit hours must be in computer science courses numbered 500 or above, not including CS 590 (Independent Study) or 591 (Thesis). Three of these hours must be CS 585 (Graduate Seminar). CS 590: 3 credit hours.

With Thesis:

Students must have demonstrated proficiency in the core undergraduate curriculum including the topics normally covered by CSE 324, 325, 331, 342, 344, and 423. Proof of proficiency usually requires grades of “C” or better in these courses or in equivalent courses approved by the department.

Course work approved by the students advisory committee fulfilling the general requirements of 24 credit hours for the masters degree. At least 15 credit hours must be in computer science courses numbered 500 or above, not including 590 (Independent Study) or 591 (Thesis). Three of these hours must be CSE 585 (Graduate Seminar). CSE 591 (Thesis): 6 credit hours.

Competency Exam

Starting in Fall 2007, in order to fulfill the proficiency requirements for a Master of Science Degree in Computer Science or a Master of Science Degree in Computer Science with Information Technology Option (see the current catalog for specific proficiency requirements, e.g., in the 2007-2009 catalog, p. 68 and 69), an M.S. student must either:

  1. Take the respective course in the department and pass it with a grade of “C” or better, or
  2. Pass the Competency Exam (which will be the same as the Ph.D. Qualifying Exam) for the respective subject.

The Competency Exam for each subject will normally be offered around the first week of the semester in which the associated course is offered; Competency Exams for courses that are not taught in the semester might also be available.

The Computer Science department clarifies that the ‘leniency policy’ (implemented in 2005) of granting a waiver for one core course not meeting the “B or better” requirement will only apply to students who enrolled in our program before Fall 2007.